First Aid Policy

Key points

 

All staff are expected to use their best endeavours in the event of a first aid emergency.

 

All staff must know:

1.      How to call the emergency services – dial 999 and ask for an ambulance. If there is any doubt that an ambulance is required, call an ambulance straight away.

2.      The location of the nearest first aid box  which will contain:

  • The name of and how to contact the Appointed Person responsible for the building or area of the School the casualty is in.
  • The name of and how to contact the First Aider (first aid trained person) responsible for the building or area of the School the casualty is in (see annex A)
  • A basic aide memoir for dealing with first aid emergencies
  • Basic first aid equipment

 

Appointed Persons are responsible for:

  •  Taking charge when someone is injured or becomes ill;
  • Ensuring that an ambulance or other professional medical help is summoned if appropriate;
  •  Looking after and restocking the first aid box and any other first aid equipment in their area of responsibility.

 

The Appointed Person is not a First Aider but it is good practice for the Appointed Person to undertake emergency first aid training to help them cope with an emergency. This training, which does not have to be Health and Safety Executive (HSE) approved, would include:

  •  What to do in an emergency
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • First aid for the unconscious casualty
  • First aid for the wounded, bleeding or burnt

 

Appointed Persons may undertake basic and/or advanced HSE approved first aid training, if funding and vacancies allow.

First Aiders are responsible for

  • Giving immediate help to casualties with common injuries or illnesses and those arising from specific hazards at School;
  •  Where necessary, ensuring that an ambulance or other professional medical help is called.

First Aiders must complete a training course approved by the HSE. Refresher training is required every three years.

Responsibility

The provision of first aid at Hyderi Islamic School is delegated by the Headmaster,  The Headmaster determines the number of Appointed Persons and the number of First Aiders and the level of training they should receive.

 

The number of Appointed Persons and First Aiders is reviewed annually by the headmaster or more frequently when required, for example following an accident or emergency.

When determining the appropriate number of Appointed Persons and First Aiders, the Headmaster:

  • The number of staff (and pupils) present at any one time;
  • The distribution of staff; 
  •  The number and locations of first-aid boxes;
  • Whether there are inexperienced members of staff; 
  • The number of staff and pupils with disabilities or specific health problems; 
  •  The size, nature (split sites/levels) and location of the school premises to which members of staff have access in the course of their employment;
  •  Whether there are travelling, remote or lone staff;
  • Parts of the school premises with different levels of risks;
  •  The types of activity undertaken;
  •  The proximity of professional medical and emergency services;
  • Any unusual or specific hazards (for example, working with hazardous substances, dangerous tools or machinery); and
  • Accident statistics. These indicate the most common types of injuries, times and locations. It is a useful tool as it highlights areas to concentrate on and tailor first aid provision to.

When selecting staff to be an Appointed Person or First Aider, the Headmaster will take into account their reliability, communication skills, aptitude to learn, ability to cope with stressful situations and the ability to leave the work that they are doing at the time.

Guidance on the minimum legal requirement for Appointed Persons and First Aiders; the recruitment, selection and training of First Aiders; the responsibility and accountability of First Aider.

 

Reporting accidents and record keeping

All members of the school community should report any accident or incident, however minor, as soon as possible after it has occurred. When an injured person is unable to complete their own details of the accident, then the Appointed Person, First Aider and/or witness should do it on their behalf.

Complete an accident report form AND enter the details in the accident book.  

 

Reports must contain:

  • The date, time and place of the event;
  • Details of those involved;
  • A brief description of the accident/illness and any first aid treatment given;
  • Details of what happened to the casualty immediately afterwards - for example went to hospital, went home, resumed normal activities, returned to class.

The Headmaster should be informed about any incident if it is at all serious or particularly sensitive. For example, when a pupil has had to go to hospital or if one pupil has caused deliberate damage to another or where negligence might be suggested.

Teachers must inform parents when any pupil requires hospital treatment.

If, as the result of an accident, a adult is taken to hospital, is unable to work or subsequently becomes absent from work, the Head teacher should be notified immediately.

The Head teacher must report all serious accidents to the HSE as required by RIDDOR.

In an emergency, the office must have contact details of pupils parents and guardians. Also have details of employees and their next of kin.

Knowing what to do in an emergency is vitally important. Consider getting some first aid training and a first aid kit, and familiarise yourself with how to deal with some of the more common situations opposite. If someone is injured, the following steps will keep them as safe as possible until professional help arrives:

  • Keep calm.
  •  If people are seriously injured call 999 immediately; contact the Appointed Person and First Aider.
  • Make sure you and the injured person are not in danger.
  • Assess the injured person carefully and act on your findings using the basic first aid steps below.
  • Keep an eye on the injured person's condition until the emergency services arrive.

 

Unconsciousness

 

Bleeding

If the person is unconscious with no obvious sign of life, call 999 and ask for an ambulance. If you or any bystander has the necessary skills, give them mouth-to-mouth resuscitation while you wait for the emergency services.

Control severe bleeding by applying firm pressure to the wound using a clean, dry dressing and raise it above the level of the heart. Lay the person down, reassure them, keep them warm and loosen tight clothing.

                                

Burns

 

Broken bones

For all burns, cool with water for at least 10 minutes. Do not apply dry dressings, keep the patient warm and call an ambulance.

Try to avoid as much movement as possible.

 

  

Contents of first aid boxes on site

  •  General first aid guidance leaflet
  • 20 individually wrapped sterile adhesive dressings/plasters (assorted size)
  •  2 sterile eye pads
  • 4 individually wrapped triangular bandages (preferably sterile)
  • 6 safety pins (do not use for children’s slings - use tape)
  • 6 medium sized (approx 12x12cm) individually wrapped sterile non-medicated wound dressings and 2 large ones (18x18cm)
  • 1 pair of disposable gloves

Please note that, for instance, eyewash will be necessary in identified areas such as labs or workshops. 

Please do not include known allergenic materials, ie Elastoplast or any creams or otherwise. 

Prescription medication such as inhalers must not be kept in first aid boxes.  

 What is anaphylaxis? 

 

Anaphylaxis is an acute allergic reaction requiring urgent medical attention. It can be triggered by a variety of allergies, the most common of which are contained in food (eg dairy products, nuts, peanuts, shellfish), certain drugs and the venom of stinging insects (eg bees, wasps, hornets).  In its most severe form the condition can be life-threatening.

Symptoms of anaphylaxis usually occur after exposure to the causative agent and may include itching, swelling of the throat and tongue, difficulty in swallowing, rashes appearing anywhere on the body, abdominal cramps and nausea, increased heart rate, difficulty in breathing, collapse and unconsciousness. No pupil would necessarily experience all of these symptoms at the same time.

Medication and control

Medication to treat anaphylactic reactions includes antihistamines, an adrenaline inhaler, or an adrenaline injection. The adrenaline injections most commonly prescribed are administered by an Epipen, a device which looks like a fountain pen and which is pre-loaded with the correct dose of adrenaline. The injections are easy to administer, usually into the fleshy part of the thigh either directly or through light clothing.

Medication for an individual pupil must be kept in a cabinet which is readily accessible, in accordance with the School's health and safety policy. If a pupil has an Epipen it is particularly important that this is easily accessible throughout the school day.  Medication must be clearly marked with the pupil's name and should be updated on a regular basis. It is the parents' responsibility to ensure that any medication retained at the school is within its expiry date.

It is important that key staff in the School are aware of the pupil's condition and of where the pupil's medication is kept, as it is likely to be needed urgently.

It is not possible to overdose using an Epipen as it only contains a single dose.  In cases of doubt, it is better to give a pupil experiencing an allergic reaction an injection rather than hold back

 Managing pupils with anaphylaxis

  •  Staff should be aware of those pupils under their supervision who have a severe allergy resulting in anaphylaxis.
  • Staff should ensure that all pupils who have an epipen prescribed to them, have their medication on them at all times, if aware of how to use it.
  • Staff should ensure that they have some knowledge of what to do if a pupil has an anaphylactic reaction. (Staff to seek advice from Sanatorium staff.)
  • If a pupil feels unwell, the Sanatorium staff should be contacted for advice.
  • A pupil should always be accompanied to the Sanatorium if sent by a member of staff.

 

Issues which may affect learning

 


Pupils with anaphylaxis should be encouraged to participate as fully as possible in all aspects of school life. It is not possible to ensure that a pupil will not come into contact with an allergen during the school day but schools should bear in mind the potential risk to such pupils in the following circumstances and seek to minimize risk whenever possible.

 

 What are the main symptoms?

  • Itching or presence of a rash 
  • Swelling of the throat 
  •  Difficulty in swallowing 
  • Difficulty in breathing 
  • Increased heart rate 
  •  Unconsciousness

 What to do if a pupil has an anaphylactic reaction

  •  Ensure that a paramedic ambulance has been called.
  •  Stay calm and reassure the pupil.
  •  Encourage the pupil to administer their own medication as taught.
  •  Summon assistance immediately from the Sanatorium.
  • Liaise with the Sanatorium staff about contacting parents.

 

Asthma

 

 

What is Asthma?

Pupils with asthma have airways which narrow as a reaction to various triggers. The triggers vary between individuals but common ones include viral infections, cold air, grass pollen, animal fur, house dust mites and passive smoking. Exercise and stress can also precipitate asthma attacks in susceptible cases. The narrowing or obstruction of the airways causes difficulty in breathing and can be alleviated with treatment.

 

Asthma attacks are characterised by coughing, wheeziness, an inability to speak properly, and difficulty in breathing, especially breathing out. The pupil may become distressed and anxious and in very severe attacks the pupil's skin and lips may turn blue.

 

Medication and control


Medication to treat the symptoms of asthma usually comes in the form of inhalers which in most cases are colour coded. Instructions will be given on the medication as to which colour coding is relevant to inhaler use in different circumstances.

Most pupils with asthma will take charge of and use their inhaler from an early age and it is good practice to allow pupils to carry their inhalers with them at all times, particularly during PE lessons. If a pupil is too young or immature to take responsibility for the inhaler, staff should ensure that the inhaler is kept in a safe but readily accessible place and is clearly marked with the pupil's name.

Pupils with asthma must have immediate access to their inhalers when they need them.

It would be helpful for parents to provide the School with a spare inhaler for use in case the original inhaler is left at home or runs out. Spare inhalers must be clearly labelled with the pupil's name and stored in a locked cabinet in accordance with the School's health and safety policy. It is the parents' responsibility to ensure that any medication retained at the school is within its expiry date.

Where pupils are unable to use an inhaler by themselves or where a pupil requires additional medication, eg a nebuliser, a health care plan must be completed. For pupils whose asthma is controlled by an inhaler, an information card giving the basic details should be completed and kept with the pupil's file.

Note that it is difficult to "overdose" on the use of an inhaler.  If a pupil tries out another pupil's inhaler there are unlikely to be serious side effects, although clearly pupils should never take medication which has not been prescribed for their own personal use.

Following discussion with the pupil and his/her parents individual decisions should be made as to whether to provide basic information on the pupil's condition to his/her peer group so that they are made aware of their classmate's needs.

 

Managing pupils with asthma

  • Staff should be aware of those pupils under their supervision who have asthma.
  • Games staff should ensure that all pupils with asthma have their salbutamol inhaler prior to commencement of a session.
  • Staff should ensure that they have some knowledge of what to do if a pupil has an asthma attack. (Staff to seek advice from Sanatorium staff.)
  • If a pupil feels unwell, the Sanatorium staff should be contacted for advice.
  • A pupil should always be accompanied to the Sanatorium if sent by a member of staff.
  • Staff supervising the trip must be aware of the pupil's condition and of any relevant emergency procedures.

 Issues which may affect learning


Pupils with asthma should be encouraged to participate as fully as possible in all aspects of school life, although special considerations may be needed before undertaking some activities. Pupils must also be allowed to take their inhaler with them on all off-site activities.

Physical activity will benefit pupils with asthma in the same way as other pupils. They may need to take precautionary measures and use their inhaler before any physical exertion. As with all pupils, those with asthma should be encouraged to undertake warm-up exercises before rushing into sudden activity, especially when the weather is cold. However, they should not be forced to take part if they feel unwell.

 

What are the main symptoms?

  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Inability to speak properly
  • Difficulty in breathing out

 

 What to do if a pupil has an asthmatic attack

  • Stay calm and reassure the pupil. Speak calmly and listen to what the pupil is saying.
  • Summon assistance from the Sanatorium. Try not to leave the pupil alone unless absolutely necessary.
  • Make sure that any medicines and /or inhalers are use promptly
  • Help the pupil to breathe by encouraging the pupil to breathe slowly and deeply and relax, Help the pupil to sit fairly upright or to lean forward slightly rather than lying flat on his/her back.
  • If the child does not respond to medication or his/her condition deteriorates call a paramedic ambulance.

 

Diabetes

 

 

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition in which the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood is too high due to the body being unable to use it properly. This is because of a faulty glucose transport mechanism due to lack of insulin. 

 

Normally, the amount of glucose in the bloodstream is carefully controlled by a hormone called insulin. Insulin plays a vital role in regulating the level of blood glucose and, in particular, in stopping the blood glucose level from rising too high.

Pupils with diabetes have lost the ability to produce insulin and therefore their systems are unable to control their blood glucose levels.  If the blood glucose level is too high, a pupil may show symptoms of thirst, frequent trips to the toilet, weight loss and tiredness. Conversely, if the blood glucose level is too low a pupil may display symptoms which include hunger, drowsiness, glazed eyes, shaking, disorientation and lack of concentration.

Medication and control

Diabetes cannot be cured but it can be treated effectively by injections of insulin and by following an appropriate diet. The aim of the treatment is to keep the blood glucose level close to the normal range so that it is neither too high (hyperglycaemia) nor too low (hypoglycaemia). All pupils with diabetes will require an individual health care plan.

In most cases pupils will have their insulin injections before and after school but some pupils may require an injection at lunchtime.  If a pupil needs to inject whilst at school he/she will know how to undertake the procedure without adult supervision. However, the pupil may require privacy in which to administer the injection. Some pupils may also need to monitor their blood glucose levels on a regular basis and again privacy may be required for this procedure.

An essential part of the treatment of diabetes is an appropriate diet whereby regular meals and good food choices help to keep the blood glucose level near normal. A pupil with diabetes will have been given guidance on food choices which should be reduced in sugar and fat but high in starch. Most pupils with diabetes will also need to eat snacks between meals and occasionally during class time. These snacks usually consist of cereal bars, fruit, crisps or biscuits. It is important to allow a pupil with diabetes to eat snacks without hindrance or fuss and to ensure that the lunchtime meal is taken at a regular time. It is also important that the School should establish with the pupil and his/her parents where supplies of fast acting sugar can be kept in case of a hypoglycaemic episode.

The issue of close communication between parents and the School is fundamental to the care of pupils with diabetes, as many aspects of growth and development will have an impact on their diabetes control. It is the parents' responsibility to ensure that any medication retained at the School is within its expiry date.

 

Following discussion with the pupil and his/her parents individual decisions should be made as to whether to provide basic information on a pupil's condition to his/her peer group so that they are aware of their classmate's needs.

 

Managing pupils with diabetes

  • Staff should be aware of those pupils under their supervision who have diabetes.
  • Games staff should ensure that all pupils with diabetes have a lucozade bottle with them (and their emergency medication and blood glucose monitoring kit) prior to commencement of a session.
  • Staff should ensure that they have some knowledge of what to do if a pupil has a hypoglycaemic episode or a hyperglycaemic episode. (Staff to seek advice from Sanatorium staff for training)
  • If a pupil feels unwell, the Sanatorium staff should be contacted for advice.
  • A pupil should always be accompanied to the Sanatorium if sent by a member of staff.

 

Issues which may affect learning

 

Pupils with diabetes should have no difficulties in accessing all areas of the curriculum including sporting activities which are energetic. However, as all forms of strenuous activity use up glucose there are some simple precautions to follow in order to assist a pupil with diabetes in maintaining an adequate blood glucose level:

  • Encourage the pupil to eat or drink some extra sugary food before the activity:
  • Have glucose tablets or a sugary drink readily available in case the pupil displays symptoms of hypoglycaemia;
  • After the activity is concluded, encourage the pupil to eat some more food and take extra fluid - these additional snacks should not affect normal dietary intake.

 

 What do in an emergency if a pupil has a hypoglycaemic (low blood sugar) episode

 

Common causes:

  • A missed or delayed meal or snack
  • Extra exercise
  • Too much insulin during unstable periods 
  • The pupil is unwell 
  • The pupil has experienced an episode of vomiting. 

 

Common symptoms:

  • Hunger
  • Drowsiness
  • Glazed eyes
  • Shaking
  • Disorientation
  • Lack of concentration

i.              Get someone to stay with the pupil - call for nursing staff/ambulance (if they are hypo, do not send them out of class on their own, their blood sugar may drop further and they may collapse.

ii.            Give fast acting sugar immediately (the pupil should have this), eg:

Lucozade

Fresh orange juice 

Sugary drink, eg Coke, Fanta 

Glucose tablets 

Honey or jam

'Hypo Stop' (discuss with Sanatorium whether this should be taken on trips off site)

iii.           Recovery usually takes ten to fifteen minutes. iv. Upon recovery give the pupil some starchy food, eg couple of biscuits, a sandwich. v. Inform Sanatorium/parents of the hypoglycaemic episode.

vi.         In some instance it may be appropriate for the pupil to be taken home from school

NB.  In the unlikely event of a pupil losing consciousness, call an ambulance (and then contact the Sanatorium).

 

A hyperglycaemic episode (high blood sugar)

Hyperglycaemic episodes occur when the blood glucose level is too high. Pupils may display the following symptoms:

  • Excessive thirst.
  • Passing urine frequently
  • A change of behaviour
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain

Care of pupils in a hyperglycaemic episode

  • Do not restrict fluid intake or access to the toilet  
  • Contact the Sanatorium and/or parents if concerned.

 

In both episodes, staff and Sanatorium should liaise about contacting parents/guardians. 

 

Cleaning up body fluids from floor surfaces

 

Avoid direct contact with body fluids, as they all have the potential to spread germs. Germs in vomit and faeces may become airborne, so it is very important to clean up body fluids quickly.

 

  1. Put on gloves and a disposable apron. Disposable latex or vinyl gloves are the best choice. However, reusable rubber gloves are acceptable as long as they are cleaned and sanitized after each use.
  2.  Sprinkle ‘sanitaire’ absorbing powder liberally on all visible material. Allow approximately 90 seconds for the powder to absorb all visible material. Be careful not to agitate the material, so that germ particles do not become airborne.
  3. Remove all visible material from the most soiled areas, using paper towel or single use disposable red cloths.
  4. Put all used paper towel and cloths into a yellow bag for incineration.
  5. The remaining visible material should then be vacuumed using a designated vacuum cleaner. The vacuum cleaner bag MUST be changed after use.
  6. Non- carpeted areas: Sanitize the area using 1:10 bleach solution (instructions follow). Because of the level of contamination the bleach solution is much stronger than the 1:1000 solution used for regular sanitizing. The bleach must contact the affected area for a minimum of 10 minutes. A red mop and bucket are designated for this use.
  7. Carpeted areas: The area should be cleaned with detergent 1:10 solution, rather than bleach solution and should contact the affected area for at least ten minutes. The area should then be shampooed or steam cleaned within 24 hours.
  8. Wash the non-disposable cleaning equipment (mops, buckets) thoroughly with soap and water, then rinse with a bleach solution.
  9. Discard gloves, disposable apron into yellow bag for incineration.   Finally wash your hands thoroughly using soap and water.

Verse of the day

" And when the Garden is brought near;- 81:13 "

Hadith of the day

Cheerfulness and good nature, purge hatred and rancour.
Muhammad Kulayni, Usul al-Kafi, vol.3, p.162 Imam Musa Al Kadhim (as)
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